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Emily Webster Murphy Named GSA Administrator

On September 2 the Trump Administration has made a selection of Emily Webster Murphy as administrator for GSA.  She previously served as GSA's chief acquisition officer in 2005, and also held a position as  Senior Counsel for the House Small Business Committee on Capitol Hill.  Ms. Murphy will be replacing Acting Administrator, Tim Horne. Picture courtesy of General Services Administration Was this helpful? Let me know by leaving a comment below or contacting me Ilene@gsaproposalmaven.com. Ilene Giles is a GSA schedules expert that has helped thousands of businesses grow with a GSA contract.  Get her FREE CD, “What You Need To Know Before Applying For A GSA schedule” or contact her today for a FREE consultation at GSAProposalMaven/meet-Ilene. Want more news like this? Sign up for my weekly newsletter click here  

By | September 13th, 2017|emily webster murphy, gsa administrator|0 Comments

GSA’s TDR Pilot Program Now Optional

GSA announced the Transactional Data Pilot Program (TDR) late in the year 2016.  The program was incorporated as a way for GSA to collect data on purchases made against a vendors GSA schedule and was mandatory for vendors to participate.  In early August of 2017 GSA submitted a refresh to declare that participation in the program is now voluntary.  The refresh also removed clauses and provisions related to implementation of Executive Order 13673, Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces. A webinar was conducted for industry on September 12, 2017 in order to receive feedback and provide industry further information on the changes.  The changes were as follows: Schedule​ ​03FAC,​ ​51​ ​V,​ ​58​ ​I,​ ​72,​ ​73,​ ​and​ ​75​ ​solicitations​ ​​will​ ​be​ ​updated​ ​to​ ​indicate​ ​that​ ​participation​ ​in the​ ​TDR​ ​pilot​ ​is​ ​voluntary.​ ​​ ​Any​ ​language​ ​regarding​ ​mandatory​ ​participation​ ​will​ ​be​ ​removed.​ ​​ ​In​ ​addition, the​ ​following​ ​clauses/provisions​ ​previously​ ​deleted​ ​from​ ​these​ ​solicitations​ ​when​ ​TDR​ ​was​ ​initially implemented​ ​will​ ​be​ ​ADDED​ ​back​ ​to​ ​accommodate​ ​offerors​ ​that​ ​​do​ ​not​ ​opt​ ​into​ ​the​ ​TDR​ ​pilot​: ● 552.212-70​ ​Preparation​ ​of​ ​Offer​ ​(Multiple​ ​Award​ ​Schedule) ● 552.215-72​ ​Price​ ​Adjustment​ ​–​ ​Failure​ ​to​ ​Provide​ ​Accurate​ ​Information ● 552.216-70​ ​Economic​ ​Price​ ​Adjustment​ ​–​ ​FSS​ ​Multiple​ ​Award​ ​Schedule​ ​Contracts ● 552.238-74​ ​Industrial​ ​Funding​ ​Fee​ ​and​ ​Sales​ ​Reporting ● 552.238-75​ ​Price​ ​Reductions ● 552.238-81​ ​Modification​ ​(Federal​ ​Supply​ ​Schedule) ● CSP-1​ ​Commercial​ ​Sales​ ​Practices​ ​Format ● CI-FSS-151-N​ ​Additional​ ​Evaluation​ ​Factors​ ​for​ ​Award​ ​to​ ​New​ ​Offerors ● CI-FSS-151-S​ ​Additional​ ​Evaluation​ ​Factors​ ​for​ ​Award​ ​to​ ​Successful​ ​FSS​ ​Program​ ​Contractors ● I-FSS-969​ ​Economic​ ​Price​ ​Adjustment​ ​–​ ​FSS​ [...]

By | September 12th, 2017|Contract Management, data reporting, TDR|0 Comments

8 Tips To Get Smart With A GSA Schedule

What do you think it takes to get started in the GSA Schedule program?  Is it as simple as a one application process or will it command work?  If you want to be successful there are a few critical steps that will put you on the right path, check them out here: Have a clear understanding- Getting a GSA schedule is not mandatory for any contractor but it definitely makes your company more appealing in the federal market.  So if you're a business and you qualify a GSA schedule is a great place to start.  Understanding the federal sector or at least having someone to represent you who has a clear understanding will help you move with ease.  GSA contracts have a formal process that is structured in accordance to the rules and regulations of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and its internal regulatory General Services Administration Acquisition Manual (GSAM).  Becoming familiar with federal language and protocol will certainly take a lot of stress out of the process. Determine if you are the right fit- Before jumping into applying you want to be sure that you are the right fit.  I have seen many customers desperately wanting to apply for the schedule to only find it would have never helped them grow in the federal market because GSA had no need for their commodity.  GSA buys all types of products and services but you want to be sure that they have a need for what you sell.  Although there are several [...]

Reducing Unnecessary Regulatory Burden

According to the Federal Register The Small Business Administration proposed a rule published August 15, 2017 requesting feedback from the public in identifying which federal rules and/or regulations should be repealed, replaced, or modified due to ineffectiveness, burdensome, unnecessary, or obsolete. This request was made based on the following Executive Orders issued by President Trump: Executive Order 13771 On January 30, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order 13771, Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs, which, among other objectives, is intended to ensure that an agency's regulatory costs are prudently managed and controlled so as to minimize the compliance burden imposed on the public. For every new regulation an agency proposes to implement, unless prohibited by law, this Executive Order requires the agency to (i) identify at least two existing regulations that the agency can cancel; and (ii) use the cost savings from the cancelled regulations to offset the cost of the new regulation. Executive Order 13777 On February 24, 2017, the President issued Executive Order 13777, Enforcing the Regulatory Agenda, which further emphasized the goal of the Administration to alleviate the regulatory burdens placed on the public. Under Executive Order 13777, agencies must evaluate their existing regulations to determine which ones should be repealed, replaced, or modified. In doing so, agencies should focus on identifying regulations that, among other things: eliminate jobs or inhibit job creation; are outdated, unnecessary or ineffective; impose costs that exceed benefits; create a serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with regulatory reform initiatives and policies; or [...]

Why Slow Down When You Can Get In The FASt Lane

If you've dealt with GSA schedules you know that the process is not completed quickly.  Dependent upon which schedule you apply for it may take anywhere from three to nine months to get an award.  Keep in mind that's if the contracting officer request minimal clarifications. In the early part of this year GSA launched a new program called GSA FASt Lane.  The program is supposed to cut down on the approval time for proposal submissions and/or modifications.  New proposal submissions can be approved in less than 45 days, and modifications can be approved in as little as 2 days.  Unfortunately, the program only applies to specific GSA schedule 70 initiatives.  Here are a list of the initiatives that apply. Health IT Solutions Cybersecurity Solutions Cloud Services Agile Delivery Services For companies that already have a GSA schedule 70 and want to add new products and services modifications can be processed in as little as 2 days under the following initiatives. Army Contracting Command (AMCOM) Express Agile Delivery Services Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) DHS Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) BPA Government-wide Strategic Solutions for Laptops and Desktops National IT Commodity Program Navy SPAWAR Enterprise Agreement Project Was this helpful? Let me know by leaving a comment below or contacting me Ilene@gsaproposalmaven.com. Ilene Giles is a GSA schedules expert that has helped thousands of businesses grow with a GSA contract.  Get her FREE CD, “What You Need To Know Before Applying For A GSA schedule” or contact her today for a [...]